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Tuesday, May 12, 2020 | History

2 edition of Nutrition and grazing behavior of the green turtle, Chelonia mydas, a seagrass herbivore found in the catalog.

Nutrition and grazing behavior of the green turtle, Chelonia mydas, a seagrass herbivore

by Karen A. Bjorndal

  • 74 Want to read
  • 27 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Statementby Karen Anne Bjorndal
The Physical Object
Paginationix, 73 leaves :
Number of Pages73
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL24528419M
OCLC/WorldCa5739437

discovered that the foraging habits of green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas) are largely determined by food availability (Bjorndal, ; Ross, ; Balazs et al., ). Variation in diets of C. mydas at different foraging grounds may affect net nu-tritional gain and in turn, reproductive output and demography (Carr and Carr, ; Bjorn-dal, ). The green turtle (Chelonia mydas) is a circumglobal species that is susceptible to overexploitation as a food resource, incidental mortality in fisheries (Alfaro-Shigueto et al., ), and coastal foraging habitat degradation, all of which have contributed to its listing as Endangered on Cited by: 5.

The green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas) is a foraging specialist, (%), while seagrass (Cymodocea nodosa) and algae accounted for % of the total wet mass. Species composition and Diet composition of a juvenile green turtle, Chelonia mydas, from the eastern Adri-Cited by: 3. Wildscreen's Arkive project was launched in and grew to become the world's biggest encyclopaedia of life on Earth. With the help of over 7, of the world’s best wildlife filmmakers and photographers, conservationists and scientists, featured multi-media fact-files for more t endangered : Reptilia.

Abstract: Green sea turtles, Chelonia mydas, are grazers influencing the distribution of seagrass within shal-low coastal ecosystems, yet the drivers behind C. mydas patch use within seagrass beds are largely unknown. Current theories center on food quality (nutrient content) as the plant responds to grazing disturbances; however.   Feeding animals is altering the behaviour and eating habits of the green turtle in the Canary Islands (Spain). This is the conclusion of a study published in the journal Science of the Total.


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Nutrition and grazing behavior of the green turtle, Chelonia mydas, a seagrass herbivore by Karen A. Bjorndal Download PDF EPUB FB2

Nutrition and grazing behavior of the green turtle, Chelonia mydas, a seagrass herbivore Item menu. Bjorndal, K. A.: Nutrition and grazing behavior of the green turtle, Chelonia Chelonia mydas, a seagrass herbivore, 72 pp. Ph.D. dissertation, University of Florida, Gainesville a Google Scholar Bjorndal, K.

A.: Cellulose digestion and volatile fatty acid production in the green turtle, Chelonia by: Nutrition and grazing behavior of the green turtle, Chelonia mydas, a seagrass herbivore Item Preview remove-circle Nutrition and grazing behavior of the green turtle, Chelonia mydas, a seagrass herbivore by Bjorndal, Karen A.

Publication date Topics Green turtle, Sea turtlesPages: This banner text can have markup. a seagrass herbivore book web; books; video; audio; software; images; Toggle navigation. After camping outside his house, penning letters, and digitizing his data, Bjorndal convinced Carr to Chair her Doctoral Committee.

She worked alongside Carr after publishing her thesis Nutrition and grazing behavior of the green turtle, Chelonia mydas, a seagrass herbivore and took over his efforts at the Centre for Sea Turtle Research once he Born: Berkley, California.

Karen A. Bjorndal has written: 'Nutrition and grazing behavior of the green turtle, Chelonia mydas, a seagrass herbivore' -- subject(s): Green turtle, Sea turtles Asked in Sea Turtles Is the green.

The green turtle, Chelonia mydas, is an endangered species for which a fundamental component of recovery and conservation is an understanding of its foraging ecology. The first step in understanding green turtle foraging ecology is to identify and document the availability of resources selected by the animals.

Identifying resource useCited by: Karen A. Bjorndal has written: 'Nutrition and grazing behavior of the green turtle, Chelonia mydas, a seagrass herbivore' -- subject(s): Green turtle, Sea turtles Asked in Sea Turtles About how. What’s in a name.

The generic name Chelonia was introduced by Brongniart (). The specific name mydas was first used by Linnaeus (). Popularly believed to have been named for the greenish tinge of its internal fat (coloured by green plant pigments from an herbivorous diet), this species is often called the “soup turtle” and was a staple in the diet of indigenous people as well as.

First Record of a Caribbean Green Turtle (Chelonia mydas) Grazing on Invasive Seagrass (Halophila stipulacea) Article (PDF Available) in Caribbean Journal of Science 48() June Green turtles (Chelonia mydas) are a prominent megaherbivore in seagrass meadows—capable of consuming large amounts of aboveground seagrass biomass and.

a threatened status and its subsequent recovery. The role Texas’ green turtle population will play in this recovery will depend, in part, on the ability of seagrass communities in the lower Laguna Madre to sustain continued growth of this population.

Seagrass community structure was characterized during March to determine if foraging. Although green sea turtles, Chelonia mydas (Linnaeus), spend but a small part of their life on the shore, biologists have accumulated masses of data on emergence from the sea, egg laying, orientation, migration of hatchlings from the nest to the sea, and so by: Type data: Lectotype (MCZ from Penang, Malaysia, a specimen of Chelonia mydas, is here treated as a paralectotype of Chelonia depressa Garman, ; although it was described as a 'cotype' of Chelonia depressa Garman, by Barbour, T.

On some Australian reptiles. Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington –; Loveridge, A. Evidence is presented for the potential role of Chelonia mydas L. in reducing the decomposition time of Thalassia testudinum Banks ex Konig leaves.

During the annual cycle of seagrasses, the plants produce organic matter, undergo senescence, and the leaves die and are exfoliated to decompose in situ or to be exported out of the by: Marine megafauna tend to migrate vast distances, often crossing national borders and pose a significant challenge to managers.

This challenge is particularly acute in the Pacific, which contains numerous small island nations and thousands of kilometers of continental margins. The green sea turtle, Chelonia mydas, is one such megafauna that is endangered in Pacific waters due to the.

Before populations of green turtles (Chelonia mydas) were severely reduced by human overexploitation, the seagrass Thalassia testudinum was intensively grazed by green turtles in the Caribbean. To explore how nutrient composition of T.

testudinum pastures responds to intense grazing pressure, we simulated green turtle grazing in 15 plots (each 3 m × 3 m) for 16 months in the central Cited by: Green turtles have small heads relative to the size of their bodies. Size and length.

On average the green turtle measures up to 5 f or m long. Their weight fluctuates from lb or 68 kg to lb or kg. The length of its carapace can be from 31 in or 78 cm to 44 in or cm.

The largest known green turtle weighed lb or kg. Diet. A globally distributed inhabitant of sea grass beds and coral reefs (Musick and Limpus ), the IUCN (International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources)-listed endangered green turtle, Chelonia mydas, has been held in veneration by many cultures and served as an important food source (Parsons ).Recorded usage of this turtle as a food source in the Cited by:   If you have ever been fishing, diving or boating in the coastal waters off Florida’s coastline and noticed a sea turtle, odds are it was a Green Turtle (Chelonia mydas).Despite its name, green turtles are typically more of a olivey-brown than green, its name originating from the greenish hue found in the turtle’s fatty : Michael Milleson.

Green sea turtles are amongst the largest turtles and are so-called because their flesh is green. They swim with their paddle-like limbs. Their heads appear small in comparison with the size of their body, which is covered in brown scales with a light colored edge.

The green sea turtle, Chelonia mydas, is one such megafauna that is endangered in Pacific waters due to the overexploitation of eggs and adults for human consumption.

Data from long-term tagging programs in Queensland (Australia) and New Caledonia were analysed to investigate the migrations by C. mydas across the Coral Sea between their nesting Cited by: Identification manual for dietary vegetation of the Hawaiian green turtle Chelonia mydas [Russell, Dennis J] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Identification manual for dietary vegetation of the Hawaiian green turtle Chelonia mydasAuthor: Dennis J Russell.